How ’bout CoreOS as your Cloud base?

I’ve heard the name CoreOS around a little bit over the last two months or so, but it hadn’t really jumped out at me until last week when Mark McCahill mentioned it in a meeting. He’d read some pretty cool things about it: minimal OS, designed for running Docker containers, easy distributed configuration, default clustering and service discovery. In particular the use of etcd to manage data between clustered servers caught my eye – we’ve been struggling at $WORK with how to securely get particular types of data into Docker containers in a way that will scale out well if we ever need to start bringing up containers on hosts that don’t physically reside in our datacenters.

CoreOSI haven’t even gotten into the meat of CoreOS yet, but just now, I accomplished a task that was surely lifted out of science fiction. With the assistance of Cobbler as a PXE server and a Docker container (what else!) as a quick host for a cloud-config file, I was able to install CoreOS in seconds and SSH into it with an SSH public-key that I provided it in the cloud-config file. I was legitimately shocked by how quick and easy it was.

Docker containers start instantly – it’s one of their best features. It allows us to ship them around with impunity; perform seamless maintenance. CoreOS hosts live in the same timescale, meaning we an PXE boot and configure new hosts, specifically designed for hosting Docker containers, in seconds, and from anywhere. CoreOS offers support for installing onto bare metal, and that would surely give you the best performance, but take a moment to comprehend the flexibility given to you by using virtual machines instead.

Make an API call to your VMWare or Xen/KVM cluster in your local or remote datacenters to create and start a virtual machine. Or do the same thing with an Amazon host. Or Google. The VM PXE boots into CoreOS, within seconds and joins its cluster, and begins getting data from the rest of the cluster. Within minutes, Docker images are downloaded and built, and containers are spinning up into production. It doesn’t get any more flexible than that. At this point scaling and disaster recovery are hindered only by your ability to produce applications that can handle it. It doesn’t matter if a particular Docker container; something happens to it, you just bring up another somewhere else. Along those lines, it doesn’t matter if an entire host is up or down. That’s what it means to be in the same timescale. Containers and their hosts can be brought up and down with impunity, with no impact to the service.

Another benefit to abstracting the CoreOS away from the bare metal is the freeing of ties to a particular technology. If you can design your systems to use the APIs of your local VM solution and the remote APIs from various cloud vendors, then you can move your services wherever you need them. As long as you can control the routing of traffic in some way (load balances, DNS, Hipache, some of the cool new things being done by Cisco), and the DHCP PXE options for your host servers, then your services are effectively ephemeral and not tied to a particular location or vendor.

For now this is all still very beta, both Docker and CoreOS, but the promise being shown is real. Everyone, from the largest internet giants to the smallest one-room startups, will benefit from the coming revolution in computing.